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Lawn mower worries

Mary and I went on a walk the other day through our neighborhood.  She found a rock along our route and, of course, being the explorer that she is, she needed to pick it up and take it with us.

In addition to being worried that Mary would put the rock in her mouth and accidentally choke on it, I was also worried that she would leave the rock in a neighbor’s lawn in the perfect position for them to hit the rock with a lawn mower and break a window or even worse – hurt someone. Maybe I worry about too many things, but lawn mowers are really scary.

In addition to projectiles being thrown from lawnmower (I still remember one of our Fisher Price “Little People” being a victim to my dad’s lawnmower), there are many other injuries that can occur in and around lawn mowers. It’s important to make sure kids are not around when the lawn is being mowed (we typically mow during nap time). In addition, it’s important to be prepared with a well maintained mower, close toed shoes, and a yard free of debris before the blades go into motion.

Also, if you have a teenager who is going to be mowing make sure to review some safety guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics to ensure that he or she is ready for this responsibility.

Comments

  1. Reply
    Nancy Crutcher June 11, 2013

    Thank you for sharing this post. We actually have the same worries. These lawn mowers are really very dangerous when a rock got hit of its propeller. It can hit someone which is very dangerous, that is why I never do this job with our grass lawn. I just leave it to my husband. Specially precaution should be observed when doing this task.

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