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High-tech dangers

As I mentioned a couple weeks ago, I recently attended the Safe Kids USA conference. Lucky for you – I’ve got all sorts of things to share!

This year, one of the main topics discussed were button batteries. In 2010 alone, more than 3,400 button battery swallowing cases were reported in the United States resulting in 19 serious injuries and in some cases even death.

These small batteries can be found in electronic devices such as mini remote controls, small calculators, watches, key fobs, flameless candles, singing greeting cards and other slim and sleek electronics.  When swallowed, these batteries can get stuck in the throat and cause severe burns, especially to small children. And the scary part – the symptoms are similar to the flu!

I’ve blogged about button batteries before, but I’ve learned the most dangerous of button batteries are those that are nickel-sized.  They are made with lithium – the true danger. What can you do to keep kids safe – throw away everything that contains a button battery? Good luck – you use and need these items every day!

I suggest taking extra precautions to learn about button batteries and the devices that contain them.

  • Look in your home for any items that may contain coin-sized button batteries.
  • Place devices out of sight and out of reach of small children.
  • Keep loose or spare batteries locked away.
  • Share this life-saving information with caregivers, friends, family members and sitters.

And remember, over the holidays you may be taking your children into homes that are not safeguarded or having visitors that may not live with children. Double check that button batteries, and other dangers, are out of sight!

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We have created this blog as a way to communicate key childrens' health and safety issues to parents and other child advocates. It is managed by Dayton Children's department of marketing communications. Comments can be sent to rodneyg@childrensdayton.org.

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