Done by one!

By: Sherman Alter, MD | medical director of infectious disease at Dayton Children’s

Is your baby protected against the infectious diseases that can be prevented through timely vaccination? This week is national infant immunization week and as an infectious disease doctor at Dayton Children’s, I encourage parents to have their infants vaccinated and to keep up with the vaccination schedule.

Getting your infant vaccinated on time will protect him or her against a number of these vaccine-preventable diseases.  While vaccines are given throughout childhood, it is vital that immunizations for babies under the age of 12 months are up to date so that they can be ….DONE BY ONE!

Ask your healthcare provider if your baby is up to date to insure that all of the recommended vaccines are done by one!  This will best insure that both your baby and other children in the community are protected against these diseases.

Useful websites for additional vaccine information:

 

Vaccine Is your infant up to date?
Chickenpox

(varicella)

Your child needs 2 doses of chickenpox vaccine.  The baby’s first dose may be given at 12 months of age (through 15 months of age)
Diphtheria,

Tetanus, and

Whooping cough (pertussis; DtaP)

Your baby ‘s first dose is given at 2 months, the second at 4 months, and the third at 6 months of age.
Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) Depending on the type of Hib vaccine given, your infant will need either 3 or 4 doses – the first given at 2 months, the second at 4 months, the third at 6 months (if needed), and the last at 12 months (through age 15 months)
Hepatitis A Two doses are needed – the first at age 1 year (and the second 6-18 months later)
Hepatitis B (HepB) Depending on the type of HepB vaccine given, your infant will need either 3 or 4 doses.  Your baby likely received the first dose at birth.  The second is given at 1-2 months, the third at 4 months (if needed).
Influenza (Flu) All babies aged 6 months and older need flu vaccines every fall and winter (and each year thereafter). Some children may need 2 doses of the vaccine in the first year of life.
Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) The first MMR vaccine may be given at 12 months (through 15 months of age)
Pneumococcal (PCV 13) Four doses of the vaccine are needed to protect babies – the first at 2 months, the second at 4 months, the third at 6 months, and the fourth at 12 months (through 15 months of age).
Polio Your baby needs a dose at 2 months, the second at 4 months, and the third at 6-18 months of age.
Rotavirus Depending on the brand of the vaccine, your child needs 2-3 doses: the first at 2 months, the second at 4 months, and the third (if needed) at 6 months.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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We have created this blog as a way to communicate key childrens' health and safety issues to parents and other child advocates. It is managed by Dayton Children's department of marketing communications. Comments can be sent to rodneyg@childrensdayton.org.

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